Browsed by
Author: president

President’s Message – September 2018

President’s Message – September 2018

September has always seemed to me a better place than January for marking the start of the new year. Seriously, who decided that a random day in the middle of winter was a good date to start a new year? There is, on the other hand, a certain logic to marking a new beginning in September. Summer ends, and harvest time arrives. Time pauses, balanced on the equinox, and then tilts towards autumn and on into winter. A new school year starts—and even long past graduation, it’s hard to shake the influence of all those new school years that shaped our childhoods. For those of us who were crazy enough to go back to school in middle age, the pattern runs even deeper. I suspect I will never be able to rid myself of the almost Pavlovian urge to rush out and buy spiral-bound notebooks at this time of year.

(I was pleased when I learned that I’m not alone in this conviction—the Jewish calendar, unlike the Gregorian one, does celebrate the new year in September. By the time you read this, Rosh Hashanah will have ushered in the year 5779. So, Shana tova—happy new year, everyone!)

Regardless of when the new year starts, I’ve never been a fan of making resolutions. They tend to focus on big changes, and big changes are hard to maintain. I really don’t need the guilt that comes along when I fail to live up to my resolutions, so I generally avoid making them in the first place. On the other hand, I have no objection to using the start of a new year to take stock and perhaps shape some intentions for the months ahead. (Intentions are less binding than resolutions and don’t carry the same sense of obligation, so there’s less guilt if I maybe don’t quite carry them out as fully as I had intended.)

One of my primary intentions for the new year is to finish more projects. I am great for coming up with ideas and starting things, but less good at carrying through. That leaves me with both lots of UFOs, and plenty of ideas banging around in my head that have never even gotten underway. The guild’s UFO challenge would have been one good way to deal with some of these, but I knew I’d be too busy to meet all those deadlines, so I didn’t sign up (guilt, remember?). But having an intention to finish more projects will be my way of focusing on the goal without setting stringent deadlines and adding stress to my quilting time—which, after all, is supposed to be fun, right?

My second intention is to expand my skill set and get better at machine work. I’m really pretty good at hand work, but unfortunately working by hand takes forever (maybe part of why I never get anything finished…) and despite years as a quilter, my relationship with my machine is still one of wary mistrust. “Precision” is not the word that comes to mind when you look at my machine piecing and applique, and let’s not even talk about machine quilting, thank you. But a couple of recent deadlines have made clear just how useful it would be to be better at machine work, and so I’ve decided I really need to put in enough practice to build a better working relationship with my machine and to move me into the “at least competent” category. (Striving for “good at this” will probably have to wait—another intention for another year, maybe.)

These are modest intentions, but I hesitate to be overly ambitious—there is so much going on in other parts of my life (school, work) that I don’t want to overreach, because that way lies failure and frustration, and like I said, quilting is supposed to be fun! But I hope that having some intentions for the coming year—and having put them out here in public for all to see!—will help me stay on track and make some progress. After all, more finished projects will mean more space on my fabric shelf, and with our upcoming Mystery Shop Hop, I just might be needing that!

See you at the meeting.

President’s Message – August 2018

President’s Message – August 2018

Is everyone enjoying the lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer? Speaking for myself, I’m not a huge fan of hot weather, which is one of the reasons I run away for part of the summer. This year, it’s not helping a whole lot – the weather in Maine has been hotter than usual (though not quite as hot as California), with a healthy dose of humidity thrown in, to boot. Not exactly ideal quilting weather! For that reason, if nothing else, fall weather will be welcome when it arrives.

Still, there are ways of coping. One option for dealing with the summer heat is to find a nice, air-conditioned quilt show to attend. As I mentioned last month, late July always brings the Maine state quilt show, where I spent a fun few days (both in the judging room beforehand, and then at the show itself). This year was even more fun than usual, because our membership director Donna Owens, who was in Connecticut at a family event, drove up for the show! She arrived before the show opened, on Wednesday afternoon, and I immediately put her to work, helping hang ribbons and name cards on the judged quilts. It wasn’t all bad for her, because signing her in as a volunteer meant she got free entry to the show the next day! I also introduced her to as many of my Maine quilting friends as I could, because I hold to the theory that there are no strangers – just quilters we haven’t met yet. I hope she had as much fun during her visit as I did. Remember: if you’re planning a summer getaway for next year, Maine during the last week in July is a great place to visit!

Another way to deal with summer is to start making plans for fall. Did you all see the flyers Terry Simon brought to the last guild meeting? Save the date, because on October 6 we’re holding our first Mystery Shop Hop! We’ve reserved a 15-passenger van, and on the morning of the hop you’ll climb aboard with absolutely no idea where we’re headed! (We will bring you back to the starting point at the end of the day, we promise…) All we’ll say is that it’ll involve multiple quilt shops, plus a stop for lunch, and a snack (most likely ice cream, because I’m the one planning this…) before we head home. A mystery adventure and fabric shopping – seriously, it doesn’t get much better than this! We’ll have a sign-up sheet at the August meeting. If we fill the first van, we’ll be happy to rent another one – but we’ll need someone to volunteer to drive it, so be thinking about who you know who might be willing to do that. (Bonus: the driver comes on the hop for free, and gets her/his lunch paid for!)

Stay cool, and see you at the meeting.

President’s Message – July 2018

President’s Message – July 2018

By now, many of you will be well on your way to finishing your July challenge entries. I’m sorry I won’t be here to see them all, but sadly I’ll be on the wrong coast—as you are getting ready for the potluck and challenge reveal, I’ll be at the opening preview for Maine Quilts, recovering from two days of running their judging room. So between these two events, the topic of quilt judging is very much on my mind right now.

Quilt judging comes up occasionally in an online group I belong to. As it’s a hand-quilting group, the discussion usually focuses on how impossible it is for hand quilting to compete against machine quilting in shows, because everyone is much more impressed with flashy machine quilting. Every time this happens, I have to sit on my hands to keep from typing, at the top of my voice, “THAT’S NOT HOW JUDGING WORKS!”

First of all, any judge who knows what she’s doing isn’t going to be judging “hand quilting” against “machine quilting”—she’s going to be judging each technique according to its own levels of excellence. By those standards, a hand-quilted entry that demonstrates even stitches, hidden knots, and a balanced distribution of quilting across the piece is easily going to beat out a machine-quilted piece with visible starts and stops, obvious tension issues, and snarled thread nests on the back.

Also, competent judges know not to let their personal preferences interfere with their evaluation of a quilt. Of course they have personal preferences—they’re human, after all! (At least the ones I’ve met are…) But they won’t allow the fact that they really do prefer machine quilting (or love blue quilts, or loathe chartreuse) to interfere with the aforementioned task of judging each quilt on its artistic and technical merits. (The exception to this rule is, of course, “Judge’s Choice” awards, where they can be as partisan as they darned well please.)

It’s also important to remember that quilt judges are not the quilt police. (Spoiler: there are no quilt police. And anyone who tries to act like one is just wrong.) Of course there are exceptions (see above re judges being human—and I have to confess that I’ve worked with one or two nightmares), but by and large, the people who become quilt judges do it because they truly love quilts, quilting, and quilters, and want to help you become the best version of your quilting self that you can. This doesn’t mean you’ll always agree with the comments you get on your entries. And that’s okay! The judges disagreed with some of my design decisions on the first quilt I ever entered for judging; I love that quilt, and still don’t regret those decisions. But even when you don’t agree, at least think about the comments and try to understand why they were made. It’s a great way to learn, and (one hopes) to improve.

I could go on and on, but right now I have to go and re-read Linda Rasmussen’s chapter in the NQA Guide to Judged Shows book to refresh my memory on setting up a judging room. (It’s a great chapter which I review every year, and I’m not just saying that because Linda’s in our guild!) Have a great time at the challenge show, and I’ll see you all next month.

President’s Message, June 2018

President’s Message, June 2018

It is a truth universally acknowledged that, no matter how much fabric one has in one’s stash, it is never quite right for the new project one is planning. Thus it was that a few weeks ago I found myself meandering through one of our affiliates’ stores where I fell into conversation with another woman who was similarly meandering. (It’s another universal truth* that, in quilt shops, there are no strangers—just quilters you haven’t met yet.) She was smitten with a Betty Boop print she had found, and wanted me to share in her delight. Now, I’m not a huge fan of Betty Boop myself, but I do think life would be dreadfully dull if we all loved the same fabric, and so I was happy to agree with her that it was a terrific find. She was even more thrilled with a bag on display which had been made from the Betty Boop fabric—but when I suggested that the shop probably carried the pattern as well as the fabric, so she could make the same bag herself, she said, “Oh, no, I’m not a quilter; I’d never have the patience for that!”

*Make that a near-universal truth. It turns out that some people in quilt shops are just there to pick out fabric for a friend.

This is not the first time I’ve heard the “no patience” explanation, and I imagine most of you have heard it too. Apparently the world would contain many more quilters were it not for the fact that quilting requires patience. Personally, I find this logic flawed, because I am probably one of the least patient people you will ever meet. If I have to wait in line more than a few minutes at the grocery store, I become annoyed—and don’t even get me started on some of the lines I’ve been in at the Starbucks drive-thru! But spending weeks, if not months, to finish a quilt? Not a problem.

Like any good academic, I approached this seeming dilemma by returning to the fundamentals: “define your terms!” According to Merriam-Webster, “patience” is defined as “the capacity, habit, or fact of being patient,” which in turn is defined as “bearing pains or trials calmly or without complaint; manifesting forbearance under provocation or strain; not hasty or impetuous; steadfast despite opposition, difficulty, or adversity.” And there we begin to see the solution: whether you think quilting requires vast reserves of “patience” or not depends on how you define “pains, trials, opposition, difficulty, adversity.” Okay, quilting may involve some pain and difficulty on occasion—anyone ever discover after sewing a border to a quilt that you should have double-checked that they were “right sides together”? Frog-stitching (rippit, rippit…) an entire border seam might indeed be a trial which prompts complaint, not to mention wailing and gnashing of teeth. But mostly, quilters regard cutting fabric into little pieces and then sewing them back together as soothing, or exciting, or [insert positive adjective of your choice here]—not painful, or difficult, or trying.

So, when people say, “I don’t have the patience to quilt,” what they’re really saying is that they don’t think it’d be fun and they really aren’t interested. I get it, because I’ve used the same excuse myself in other contexts. (Cake decorating comes immediately to mind.) But that’s okay! The world would be dull if we all loved the same fabric, and the world would be dull if we all followed the same passions. Besides, thanks to all those people who don’t have the patience to quilt, there’s more fabric for the rest of us.

See you at the meeting!

President’s Message, May 2018

President’s Message, May 2018

I hope you all had a wonderful time at last month’s Yard Sale, and were able to give new homes to lots of deserving fabric and books! I was sorry to miss it but unfortunately was on the wrong side of the country, attending a conference in Washington DC. Since my brother lives just outside DC, I also built a few extra days into the trip so I could visit him and do some touristy stuff.

I am a huge fan of the Smithsonian, and every time I’m in DC I try to get to at least one or two of the museums. One of my favorites is the National Museum of American History—at least in part because that’s where the Smithsonian’s quilt collection is housed! I had hoped to be able to see the famous Harriet Powers “Bible Quilt” on this visit, but unfortunately it wasn’t on display—but I did get to see a quilt being shown in the “American Democracy: A Leap of Faith” exhibit.

Well before women were allowed to vote, they used their quilts as a means of political expression—think of how many traditional quilt blocks are named after presidents! Women also made creative use of political campaign ribbons (the 19th century equivalent of today’s campaign buttons). The quilt I saw was made by Abigail Ann Lane; her husband was William Bagley Lane, an engraver/printer in Philadelphia, who printed (among other things) these sorts of ribbons. The Lane family history suggests that Abigail’s quilt was probably made from overstock. The quilt’s center is a small pieced star, but the rest is made up entirely of political ribbons—432 of them in three different designs. The most prevalent ribbon design was printed in honor of William Henry Harrison’s inauguration in 1841 (as you’ll recall, he was the president who died after only a month in office, which prompted a re-release of the inauguration ribbons with Harrison’s date of death added at the bottom!). The quilt appears to be in magnificent condition after almost 180 years; sadly, the exhibit notes didn’t give any information on whether this quilt was ever actually used, or just made as a “show” piece.

I don’t think that anyone would argue that some aspects of quilting have changed a lot since 1841. There have been huge changes even since I started quilting in 1989: that was the year Caryl Bryer Fallert scandalized the quilting world by winning the AQS Best of Show award with a machine-quilted entry, and my first quilting teacher was still sure that rotary cutters were a fad that would never last. But in other ways, we’re still very much like our quilting ancestors, using our art to express our opinions on a vast range of topics—anyone who attended QuiltCon (in either 2016 or 2018) saw plenty of social and political commentary in the quilts on display. I love the fact that, while our techniques may have evolved in ways our19th-century forbears could never have imagined, Abigail Ann Lane would still find something familiar in the quilts we make today.

See you at the meeting,

Pam

President’s Message, April 2018

President’s Message, April 2018

Anyone else here spend way too much time online? I belong to a number of quilt groups on Facebook, and can get completely lost in scrolling through the gorgeous pictures and adding lots of stuff – more than I can make in a lifetime! – to my personal “ideas” files. But in addition to the pictures, there are sometimes discussions, and one that crops up over and over is the difficulty some people have in finding “in person” guilds where they feel welcome. They share horror stories about joining guilds where the cliques are so fixed that no outsider could possibly make inroads, or where their quilts are mocked and criticized by the dreaded “Quilt Police.” I read these accounts, shudder, and thank my lucky stars that I’ve never belonged to a guild like that.

I joined my first guild (in Michigan) in the early 90s, just a few years after I began quilting. This group was home to a couple of Big Name quilters, and it’s a good thing I didn’t know that at first or I probably would never have dared to join. My advanced-beginner work got the same applause at Show and Tell as everyone else’s, and no one laughed when I entered a piece in the guild’s show, despite my distressingly wavy borders. (And I learned that Big Name quilters are pretty much just like the rest of us, and not to be feared after all.)

When I moved to Maine, I soon found another guild. This one was a state guild, broken down into about 70 local “chapters.” Most chapters meet monthly, and there are three guild-wide meetings per year, plus the big guild show every July. I started volunteering at the show as a way to meet more people, and eventually ended up chairing the show’s Judged Division. I suppose it’s possible that, somewhere among the guild’s 2,000+ members, there are some who are less than welcoming and kind (quilters are, after all, human), but I’m pleased to say that I’ve never come across them.

When I moved out to California, it wasn’t long before I missed communing with my kind and went in search of a local guild. A few years ago I saw an ad for the WFQG Yard Sale, showed up that evening, and essentially never left. Everyone I spoke to was friendly, and everyone was there because of a shared love of quilts and quilting. Again, I found that volunteering was a terrific way to meet new people in the guild: when Terry asked me to become the “guest hostess,” I agreed, and when the guild needed a new newsletter editor, I signed on for that too. Of course, there are plenty of other ways for people to become more involved in the guild without joining the board – between small groups, challenges, retreats, and special projects like this year’s Round Robin, everyone can be as active as she/he wants to be! I love that our membership runs the gamut from brand new quilters to quilt professionals, and I hope that each of you knows how much your presence is valued – WFQG wouldn’t be the awesome group it is without you.

I’m so grateful that in my almost-30 years as a quilter, I’ve been lucky enough to find myself part of three amazing guilds that helped me to grow, both as a quilter and as a person, and I really wish I could convince some of those online quilters that it is possible to find in-person guilds that are not dominated by “mean girls.” Maybe I should just invite them all to move to California and join us!

See you at the meeting,

Pam

President’s Message, March 2018

President’s Message, March 2018

I received an email from Road to California a few days ago, inviting me to participate in a survey about the quilt industry. (One of their goals in holding the guild attendance challenge this year was to build their email list, so if you attended the show and signed in as a guild member, chances are good you received this email too.) Some of the questions were pretty straightforward: What age group were you in when you started quilting? Which of these national/international shows have you attended in the past year? Which of these national/international shows do you plan to attend in the next 5 years? (Okay, I fudged a little on that one. Hey, a girl can dream, right?) Some of them were harder: what is the financial value of all the quilting supplies you own, including machines/fabric/tools/notions? (Seriously, ARE there actually people out there who know exactly how much fabric they have in their stash, and can put an accurate dollar amount on it? I suppose anything’s possible, but I certainly don’t…)

And then there were the truly impossible: the questions asking about what kind of quilts you make and/or admire – but limiting you to only TWO selections from the answer list. You may have heard wailing and gnashing of teeth as I tried to decide which choices to eliminate. Because the truth is that I am a quilting omnivore. Possibly even a quilting gourmand. I have no restraint. I love them all.

The first quilt class I took taught traditional hand piecing, back in the olden days when everyone thought rotary cutters were just a fad. And from the very beginning, I was hooked. I picked star blocks for my four-block sampler class project, and one of them was Carpenter’s Wheel, because no one told me that beginners shouldn’t try a block that had 60 pieces and all those bias edges. I still love weird shapes and lots of little pieces, which may help explain why it takes me so long to actually finish anything.

A year or two later, I decided to give appliqué a try. If you were to ask me when I’m not actively working on an appliqué project, I’ll tell you that I really prefer piecing—but every time I find myself appliquéing something, I remember how much I do love it! And with so many different ways to appliqué—needle turn, back-basting, freezer paper on top, freezer paper underneath, reverse-appliqué, and on and on—no one could ever possibly get bored with it.

Then there are whole cloth quilts. Most quilts rely on a combination of construction, color, and quilting to impress a viewer. A whole cloth quilt, though, has to do all that work with just the quilting design. Well, mostly with the quilting design. Some of them do involve a lot of color—go check out the International Quilt Study Center’s “Quilt of the Month” (http://www.quiltstudy.org/about/quilt_of_the_month/) if you don’t believe me.

Much as I love traditional quilts, I also adore modern ones—the combination of crisp geometric motifs, wide expanses of negative space, and solid fabrics has an undeniable appeal. My first attempts at improvisational piecing caused a bit of stress to my precision-piecing self, but now that I’ve tried it a few times, I have to admit it’s occasionally fun to throw concerns about sharp points and matched seams to the winds!

I guess I could maybe draw a line at art quilts. I am reasonably sure I’ll never make one; I can’t create recognizable images with pencils or crayons or paint, so I don’t imagine I could do any better with fabric! Then again, I probably couldn’t eliminate them from the list either, because I do admire them, and marvel at the people whose skills and artistry are so different from my own.

So I can’t understand how the survey-writers expected us to narrow our choices down to just two! I really don’t remember how I ended up answering those questions—but the only way I could have answered honestly is if the options had included “all of the above”!

See you at the meeting,

Pam

President’s Message, February 2018

President’s Message, February 2018

One of my favorite items in McCall’s Quilting magazine is the monthly Q&A column, where editors answer questions posed by readers. Since being a full-time grad student with multiple part-time jobs doesn’t leave a whole lot of extra time, it was only recently that I was catching up with the Nov/Dec issue, in which the question was “Why do you quilt?” Almost simultaneously, a “get your work out there” challenge I signed up for in a creative professionals’ group (hashtagged – is that even a word? – below) asked, on its first day, “Why do you create?” Given that there are no coincidences, it seems the universe really wants me to think about this question!

Growing up, I didn’t self-identify as “artistic”; while my early school years required everyone to take art classes, I never showed any particular aptitude for it, and so it might have ended were it not for a particularly obnoxious high school guidance counselor. Beginning in ninth grade, students were allowed to choose some elective classes, and so at the end of eighth grade we had class meetings about how to make our selections. The only thing I now remember about those sessions was the guidance counselor telling us that all the girls should take typing. Now, if he had said everyone should take typing, I might have thought “Good idea, it’s a useful skill”—but even in the mid-1970s I was a fire-breathing feminist; when he limited typing to a skill set that only girls needed to have, my response was to say “Um, no,” and sign up for art instead. So one of the first reasons I chose to make art was, I suppose, as an act of rebellion against a society that wanted to define my roles for me. (Turns out this is not an unusual motivation for people who make art, so I guess I ended up stereotyped after all. Alas.)

I came to quilting much later. While I did do various types of needlework in my early years, there was unfortunately no tradition of quilting in my family. I stumbled onto it during grad school (round one), and started collecting quilting magazines; I finally took my first class a few years later when I was stationed at Fort Dix, NJ (a couple of colleagues’ wives found out I was interested and signed me up for a local adult ed. class). The year was 1989, when the quilting world was scandalized by a machine-quilted AQS show winner, and our instructor was convinced that rotary cutters were just a fad that would never last. Almost thirty years later (yikes!) I’m still at it—which makes this the longest-lived of my artistic ventures.

Why have I stuck with quilting for so much longer than any other form of art? I think the answer is closely related to the rebellion that led me to take that high school elective. Quilting has allowed me a freedom of expression that no other needle art has. In that first quilting class, our final project was a four-block sampler, where the choice of blocks and colors was entirely up to each student—a far cry from my cross stitch and needlepoint patterns that made every design choice for me. Of course I sometimes use other people’s patterns, but early on I also fell in love with making up my own. Most of them are still fairly traditional, but the block and fabric choices are all up to me, and it’s impossible to get bored when the options are almost endless!

So there it is: it seems that rebellion and the pursuit of freedom turned me into the quilter that I am today. (And some people think quilters aren’t radical…)

See you at the meeting,

Pam

#CreativePassiontoProfit

President’s Message, January 2018

President’s Message, January 2018

Greetings, and Happy New Year to all of you! The new year brings some new faces on the Board—or, in some cases, some existing (I don’t want to say “old”) faces in some new roles. In keeping with this year’s Round Robin challenge, three of us simply passed our previous Board positions to each other: I passed the job of Newsletter Editor to Carol Simpson, Carol passed Treasurer to Terry Simon, and Terry passed President to me! She assured me that being President didn’t involve much—I just had to sit back and let everyone else around me do the work. So far I think the hardest part is going to be writing the monthly President’s column for the newsletter—Terry’s were always hilarious, and she’s going to be a hard act to follow.

For those of you who don’t know me yet, a brief introduction: I am really a Mainer, but came out to California six years ago because I thought that going back to school at fifty would be a good idea. (The jury’s still out on that. Ask me again after I graduate.) Back in the spring of 2014 I had finished a big class presentation and decided I needed to do something “quilty” to de-stress; I found an announcement online about the WFQG yard sale, came to pet the fabric and commune with my kind, and never left. I’m working on a degree in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at Claremont School of Theology, and hope to be a teacher when I grow up. Actually, I’ve heard it said that if you haven’t grown up by the time you turn 50, you don’t have to, which is a relief—but at some point I do need to finish qualifying exams and a dissertation, and find a job. After all, I have a fabric habit to support. My quilting friends back in Maine refuse to believe that I chose the school based on the faculty here; they’re all convinced it was because of the proximity to the Road to California show. (I swear that was just a very happy coincidence.)

Speaking of Road to California, how many of you are planning to go? Do you want to help WFQG maybe win a prize while you’re there? This year, Road is hosting a “Guild Attendance Challenge,” and giving away two $500 prizes, one to the guild with the highest total number of members attending the show, and the other to the guild with the highest percentage of their membership attending. We probably can’t compete in the total-number category, as there are guilds out there that are bigger than ours, but I think—based on the number of us who have attended in previous years—we stand a good chance in the highest percentage category! So please, when you go to Road this year, check in at the information desk, and sign in as a member of WFQG. (For those of you who are members of multiple guilds, it apparently will be possible for you to sign in to them all, so you don’t have to choose which of your groups to support.) Remember, your sign-in might be the one that puts us over the top and wins the prize!

See you at the meeting,

Pam

Presidents Message November 2017

Presidents Message November 2017

For two years now I have been able to call myself President of the Wandering Foot Quilt Guild. It does not sound as fancy as President of the United States but I think it sounds like a lot more fun. And it has been a lot more fun, so I thought I would talk a little bit about what has been accomplished in that time. First of all, we have had two yard sales that were very successful. I had nothing to do with those. We have also had a boutique. That was really successful and mostly due to Manny and his wonderful team of helpers. Again, I had nothing to do with that.  We have had some fun and inspirational speakers. Yep, not me!  One of those speakers is leading to a new opportunity for next year, a Round Robin Program. I’ll help with this and, certainly, participate, but I didn’t do anything on this either. There have been three retreats and one coming up soon. I didn’t organize those. Challenges, yes, there were two!  I participated but didn’t have much to do with them. We had three quilt shows at the Santa Anita Mall.. not me.  We will have two holiday parties and a couple of pot lucks. You guessed it, not me. Well, I did bring stuff and I did eat but that isn’t anything unusual. I didn’t have much of anything to do with charity quilts or dog beds. That was everyone else and Neola.
So, what did I do?  Well, I encouraged Linda to make a bunch of changes to the bylaws. That drove her nuts. I started Carol S on a project to get our 501c3 but my part has stalled the whole thing. Grrrr. Other than that, I mostly hung around and watched everyone else work. I sat at a table and talked to wonderful members I hadn’t really met before. I got a front row seat to the talent and caring shown by our guild. I laughed, I gabbed and,generally, enjoyed myself..  Best Job Ever!!!
I cannot say enough about every officer, chairperson and other folk I have interacted with. Thank you, thank you all for making this so much fun.
See you at the meeting.